• Introduction
  • Construction Date
  • Developmental Stages
  • Demolition and Reconstruction
  • Historical Chronology
    After joining 2016 Taiwan School Cyberfair, our team decided to join the International Cyberfair in 2017 again. When we were discussing the research topic, one of the members thought of a place called Lukang Train Station when he had visited Lukang. There were even a board written with “Sugar Factory Popsicle” and an old building of the flour factory. All of us wondered why there was once a train station in Lukang? So, out of curiosity, we decided to take “Lukang Train Station” as our research topic and started our trip of 2017 International Cyberfair.

    Only a few people know there was once a train station in Lukang. But, some of us remembered seeing the sign of Lukang Train Station near the Wen-Wu Temple. So, was there “ONE” train station in Lukang? No, actually, there were TWO train stations in Lukang during the Japanese colonial period. One is 明治Ming-Zhi Lukang Train Station, and the other is 新高Xin-Gao Lukang Train Station. After the World War II, Taiwan Sugar Company was established. Then, Taiwan Sugar Company combined the two stations into one, and gave it a new name—Lukang Train Station. The evidence for the research finding is as follows.


Evidence One:
   Mr. Zhao-ting Yang(楊肇庭) is the first person our team interviewed. Mr. Yang is an expert who knows quite a lot about the railways in Taiwan, which helps us a lot in our project. Mr. Yang has kept the habit of collecting newspaper clipping about train reports. After the interview, Mr. Yang generously shared his collections about train reports with us. We read an important report on the United Daily News on April 1st, 2004. In the report, Huang-shi-yi Xu, mother of a famous photographer called Cang-ze Xu in Lukang, recalled that the Lukang Train Station was called Changhua Train Station during the Japanese colonial period. There was another train station called Yualin Train Station during the Japanese colonial period. Then, Taiwan Sugar Company removed the Yualin Train Station after Taiwan was retroceded.

From Mr.Yang's collecting newspaper

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Evidence Two:
   We have been to the Dormitory of Lukang Mayor, now the Museum of Lukang History, to look for information. We found an old street map about Lukang during the Japanese colonial period. We can see two train stations on the old Lukang street map, and the two stations are located to the places where Ms. Xu mentioned.

Evidence Three:
   When we looked for information in the Dormitory of Lukang Mayor, now the Museum of Lukang History, we found the book Lukang Town Records. In this books, Professor Bao-cun Dai(戴寶村) wrote about Lukang transportation during the Japanese colonial period. Professor Dai also mentioned the two train stations in Lukang—明治驛Ming-Zhi Station and新高驛Xin-Gao Station.

Evidence Four:
   During the summer vacation, two of our members went to Nation Taiwan Library in Taipei. They found a map during the Japanese colonial period, which was published by Yuan-Liou Publishing Corporation. On the map, we can see there are signs of train stations near the Wen-Wu Temple.

Source: Retaken from Geological Mapping of Taiwan at 1:25,000 Scale during the Japanese Colonial Period, Published by Yuan-Liou Publishing Co., Ltd.


Feedback/Reflection:
    At first, we have no idea that there was train station in Lukang. However, our teacher guided us how to look for information and how to observe the things around us. So, we can organize the information we gathered and get a clearer picture of Lukang Train Station. We really appreciate Mr. Yang’s collection about train reports. So, now just visit our website to know more about Lukang Train Station.
  Since there were two train stations in Lukang, then when were the two stations constructed? Please take a look at the table below.

The Picture of the Stations
The Name of the Stations
(during the Japanese colonial period)

新高鹿港驛
Xin-Gao Station

明治鹿港驛
Ming-Zhi Station
Construction Date
In August, 1911
In March, 1919
Location
Across from Wen-Wu Temple
The parking lot in Wen-Wu Temple
Notes
    We couldn’t find the old picture of the station during the Japanese colonial period, so we used the picture after being reconstructed.
    We tried hard but failed to find pictures of Ming-Zhi Station. So, we just took pictures in the parking lot in Wen-Wu Temple to show there was once a station called Ming-Zhi Station.
Related newspaper clipping
Source: Daily News, in 1911
Source: Daily News, in 1919
Notes for newspaper clipping
  The news clipping above says that the railway line between Changhua and Lukang was opened by Xin-Gao Sugar Company. The opening ceremony was held in the square of the Wen-Wu Temple and over 200 people attended the ceremony.
(Japanese translation with the help of our teacher)

  The news clipping above says the railway line between Yualin and Lukang was opened officially by Da-Ho Sugar Company. The great opening ceremony was held in Lukang.
(Japanese translation with the help of our teacher)

Source: Searching Lukang Wen-Wu Temple by Google Map, edited with the software Paint

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  Lukang had two train stations, Xin-Gao Station and Ming-Zhi Station, during the Japanese colonial period. How did the two stations develop with time? Please take a look at the table below.

The Picture of the Stations
The Name of the Stations
(during the Japanese colonial period)

新高鹿港驛
Xin-Gao Station

明治鹿港驛
Ming-Zhi Station
興建日期
In August, 1911
In March, 1919
Developmental Stages
1. After the station was established, the business of carrying passengers and goods among Lukang, QiGouZi, MaMingShan, CiTongJiao and Changhua was started.

2. 1912, new line: Changhua –ZhongLaio – Hemei.

3. 1914, new station “GanZiJing Station”

4. 1923, new stations “GuoGouZai Station” and “XianXi Station”

5. 1936, Xin-Gao Station was reconstructed.

6. 1946, the line Lukang – XianXi was changed into Taiwan Sugar Changhua Line

7. 1953, XiHu line railway was extended and connected to Changhua line railway, and the two stations were combined as one station, called Lukang Train Station.

8. 1975, because of the serious operating loss, the business of carrying passengers was cancelled. Only the raw material line that carries sugar canes was kept.

9. 1988-1989, the railway in DaTieCuo-Changhua Line was demolished. Only the railway in Lukang-DaTieCuo Line was left for carrying the sugar canes.

1. Run the business of carrying passengers and goods between Lukang Station and Yualin Station.

2. 1922, new stations: GongChangQian Station and FanShe Station.

3. 1933, new stations: XiHu Station and NanYualin Station.

4. 1946, Lukang – Yualin Line was renamed as Taiwan Sugar XiHu Line.

5. 1953, XiHu line railway was extended and connected to Changhua line railway. Taiwan Sugar XiHu Line Station was combined into Taiwan Sugar Changhua Line station. Since then, Taiwan Sugar XiHu Line Station had disappeared.

Source: Taiwan People’s Voice Daily, 1952.3.23
Stops
Stops
Operating Kilometers
新高鹿港Xin-Gao Lukang Station
0
前厝QianCuo
0.9
崎溝子QiGouZi
3.9
三塊厝SanKuaiCuo
5.4
馬鳴山MaMingShan
6.1
下莿桐腳XiaCiTongJiao
7.6
莿桐腳CiTongJiao
8.5
平和厝PingHeCuo
9.1
西門口XiMenKou
10.3
彰化Changhua
11.3
過溝子GuoGouZai
11.9
茂盛厝MaoShengCuo
13.4
新庄子XinZhuangZi
14.2
中寮ZhongLiao
14.7
會社橫HuiSheHeng
15.2
柑子井GanZiJing
16.5
竹圍子ZhuWeiZi
17.3
和美Hemei
18.4
北勢頭BeiShiTou
19
月眉YueMei
19.5
十五張犁ShiWuZhangLi
21.3
線西XianXi
22.5
 
Stops
Operating Kilometers
明治鹿港Ming-Zhi Lukang Station
0
富景FuJing
番社FanShe
2.8
外中WaiZhong
5
瓦磘WaYao
5.6
埔鹽PuYan
7
頂寮DingLiao
9.1
北溪湖BeiXiHu
11
溪湖Xihu
11.9
新溪湖XinXiHu
12.1
巫厝WuCao
14.3
二重湳ErChongNan
16.3
坡心PoXin
18.4
南員林NanYuanLin
21
員林YuanLin
21.2
 
Summarized from Taiwan Railway Blog

 

The Statistical Data of Passengers Carried by Lukang Sugar Railway
During the Japanese Colonial Period
  Both Xin-Gao Station and Ming-Zhi Station in Lukang ran the business of carrying passengers and goods. As for the business of carrying passengers, we found the statistical data between the year 1920 and 1938 from the book “History of Lukang: Transportation.” There are more passengers in Xin-Gao Station than in Ming-Zhi Station every single year. The reason might be that passengers could take trains from Xin-Gao Station to Changhua, and then transferred to places around Taiwan by taking trains at Changhua Train Station. The statistical data of passengers that sugar railway trains in Lukang took was listed as follows:

Year
Route
The Number of Passengers Every Year
Daily Average Number of Passengers
First-class
Second-class
Third-class
In total
In 1920
Ming-Zhi
2,179
0
146,161
148,340
406
Xin-Gao
3,306
0
354,838
358,144
981
In 1921
Ming-Zhi
3,289
0
149,548
152,837
418
Xin-Gao
2,057
0
325,023
327,080
896
In 1922
Ming-Zhi
1,657
0
116,872
118,529
325
Xin-Gao
2,301
0
274,393
276,694
758
In 1923
Ming-Zhi
1,374
0
95,637
97,011
266
Xin-Gao
1,890
0
261,176
263,066
721
In 1924
Ming-Zhi
1,467
0
109,211
110,678
303
Xin-Gao
1,489
0
296,144
287,633
788
In 1925
Ming-Zhi
1,701
0
140,865
142,566
390
Xin-Gao
2,176
0
356,142
358,318
982
In 1926
Ming-Zhi
1,616
0
163,330
164,946
452
Xin-Gao
2,656
0
464,153
466,809
1,279
In 1927
Ming-Zhi
1,488
0
174,490
175,978
482
Xin-Gao
2,481
0
429,458
431,939
1,183
In 1928
Ming-Zhi
1,264
0
139,090
140,354
385
Xin-Gao
2,510
0
416,241
418,751
1,147
In 1929
Ming-Zhi
1,147
0
145,833
146,980
403
Xin-Gao
783
0
560,097
560,880
1,537
In 1930
Ming-Zhi
638
0
115,089
115,727
317
Xin-Gao
818
0
497,920
498,738
1,366
In 1931
Ming-Zhi
193
0
49,138
49,311
135
Xin-Gao
268
179
326,537
326,984
896
In 1932
Ming-Zhi
84
0
33,499
33,583
92
Xin-Gao
0
278
320,928
321,206
880
In 1933
Ming-Zhi
44
0
32,383
32,427
89
Xin-Gao
0
327
289,583
289,910
794
In 1934
Ming-Zhi
39
0
67,508
67,547
185
Xin-Gao
0
255
421,362
421,617
1,155
In 1935
Ming-Zhi
64
12
76,066
76,142
209
Xin-Gao
0
307
676,789
677,096
1,855
In 1936
Ming-Zhi
0
49
78,445
78,494
215
Xin-Gao
0
135
762,427
762,562
2,089
In 1937
Ming-Zhi
0
0
8,682
86,832
238
Xin-Gao
0
244
812,329
812,573
2,226
In 1938
Ming-Zhi
0
11
110,686
110,697
303
Xin-Gao
0
0
844,117
844,117
2,313
Source: Collected from History of Lukang: Transportation pp.91-92, edited by Bao-cun Dai

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  Taiwan Sugar Company combined the two stations, Xin-Gao Station and Ming-Zhi Station, and renamed the station as Lukang Train Station. After that, Taiwan Sugar Company continued to run the business of carrying passengers and goods in Changhua Line and Yualin Line. However, why did the related business come to an end? And how did Lukang Train Station disappear at last? Please take a look at our research.

The picture of Lukang Train Station before being demolished
Provided by Pasoa Railway Culture Office

I. Business of carrying passengers & goods
1. Business of carrying passengers: Because of the operating loss, Lukang Station ended its business of carrying passengers in 1975. Only the raw material line of carrying sugar canes was kept.

2. Business of carrying goods: Affected by the combination of sugar factories in Changhua, the railways related with sugar factories were ended up or even demolished.
(1) 1988-1989: Taiwan Sugar Company demolished the railway of DaTieCuo-Changhua Line and only kept the railway of DaTieCuo – Lukang to carry the sugar canes.
(2)1994: DaTieCuo Farm was reconstructed into Labor Building. Lukang Train Station had completely lost its function of carrying goods.
(3) 1996: The inner railway in Lukang Station was demolished, and the wooden station house was kept temporarily.
(4) 2002: Lukang Train Station was demolished by Taiwan Sugar Company.
(5) 2004: Lukang Train Station was rebuilt by Taiwan Sugar Company to sell products of Taiwan Sugar Company.
(6) 2014: Taiwan Sugar Company ended the business of selling popsicles. Lukang Train Station was closed.


II. Related newspaper clipping

Source: the United Daily News, 1994 December 15. Stories of Taiwan Trains. Written by Mr. Zhi-wen Hong(洪致文). Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang.
Source: Taiwan News, 1997 July 12. Collect Folk Songs in the Country. Written and Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang.

Taiwan Sugar Company’s train station in Lukang will be rebuilt with the original materials
【Source: the United Daily News, Changhua County News, March 13rd, 2002】
【記者董順隆╱鹿港報導】
  鹿港鎮台糖小火車站今年一月遭拆除,許多鹿港人相當感傷,縣長翁金珠昨天表示台糖已答應用原材料重建車站,縣政府計畫將車站旁的隆昌製粉廠列為一鄉鎮一特色文化館,與小火車站結合為觀光文化商圈。台糖鹿港鎮小火車站位於泰興里中山路旁,古蹟文武廟斜對面,地處鹿港交通咽喉,台糖小火車站是日據時代興建,早年是鹿港人重要交通據點,許多人早年在小車站搭車到彰化市上學上班,對車站有著深厚感情。
  Taiwan Sugar Company train station in Lukang was demolished in January this year. Many local people in Lukang were sad about that. So, Changhua county mayor Wen Jin-Zhu said that Taiwan Sugar Company had promised to use the original materials to rebuild the train station. The train station was located beside ZhongShan Road and on the opposite corner of Wen-Wu Temple. Its location was the main street in Lukang, and many people used to take the train to Changhua for work or school in the past. Therefore, many people had many good memories of the station.

  前縣議員施長溪說,他讀彰化高中時,都是搭台糖小火車通學,許多人對車站懷有深厚感情,台糖今年一月突然拆除車站,不少人相當難過,希望政府能重視它的文化價值。
  Former County Council member Chang-xi Shih(施長溪) said that he used to take the train to school when studying in Changhua Senior High School. Many people like him were deeply connected to the train station. However, Taiwan Sugar Company suddenly demolished the train station in January, which made many people feel quite sad. They hoped that the authorities concerned could cherish its cultural values.

  翁金珠說,去年底她陪文建會主任委員陳郁秀勘察台糖鹿港鎮小火車站,認為很有保留價值,沒想到台糖接著將它拆除,台糖公司解釋說車站老舊,為了安全顧慮才予以拆除,她建議台糖公司運用舊料重建,並且強化建築結構,台糖公司同意,並且表示台糖打算用車站用地規畫商圈。
  Changhua County Mayor said that she had thought the train station was so valuable that we should preserve it. However, Taiwan Sugar Company just demolished it out of safety concerns. She suggested Taiwan Sugar Company to use the original materials to rebuild the train station, and her suggestion was accepted by Taiwan Sugar Company.

III. Old Pictures to Cherish memories of Lukang Train Station
Picture 1: Xin-Gao Lukang Station during the Japanese colonial period
Picture 2: The steam train of Xin-Gao Sugar Factory left Xin-Gao Station and headed toward Changhua.

Picture 3: The scenes of railway in front of Wen-Wu Temple in Lukang
Source: Thanks Mr. Ye Yang(楊燁) for providing old pictures, from Picture 1 to Picture 3, during the Japanese colonial period.
Picture 4: The old side view of the Lukang Station before being demolished.
Picture 5: The old front view of the Lukang Station before being demolished
Retaken from Cang-ze Xu’s photos in Lukang’s Glory: Collections of Pictures about Lukang History and Life, edited by Xi-lin Nia, published by Lukang Culture and Education Foundation, on p. 186
Retaken from Cang-ze Xu’s photos in Lukang’s Glory: Collections of Pictures about Lukang History and Life, edited by Xi-lin Nia, published by Lukang Culture and Education Foundation, on Page 187

 

Picture 6: The railway beside Wen-Wu Temple
Provided by Mr. Shi-xian Chen(陳仕賢), Lukang Old Pictures, p.31
Picture 7: Lukang Train Station before being demolished
Provided by Mr. Shi-xian Chen(陳仕賢), Lukang Old Pictures, p.31

 

Picture 8: Lukang Train Station before being demolished.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 9: Lukang Train Station and the rails inside the station.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

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Picture 10: Cars with sugar canes and the yellow caboose were parked in Lukang Train Station.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

Picture 11: Patrol Car was ready to start off.
Provided by Pasoa Railway Culture Office

 

Picture 12: The rails in front of Lukang Train Station before being demolished.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 13: The Hitachi train and the cars with sugar canes were parked in Lukang Train Station.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

 

Picture 14: The Hitachi train with sugar canes was ready to head toward Changhua
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 15: The sugar train left Lukang Train Station and headed toward Changhua.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

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Picture 16: The sugar train left Lukang Train Station and headed toward Changhua.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 17: The Hitachi train was ready to load with sugar canes.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

 

Picture 18: Arrive at the terminal station “DaTieCuo Farm” and get ready to turn around.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 19: Load with sugar canes on DaTieCuo Farm.
Provided by Pasoa Railway Culture Office

 

Picture 20: The rails to DaTieCuo Farm were being demolished. 【Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 21: The Hitachi train left Lukang Train Station and headed toward XiHu.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

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Picture 22: The train left Lukang Train Station and headed toward XiHu.
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang
Picture 23: Perspective drawing of the outside view of Lukang Train Station
Provided by Mr. Zhao-ting Yang

 

Picture 24: Taken from the poster of Lukang Town Mayor’s Dormitory.

Thanks to people who provide old pictures of Lukang Train Station:
1. Mr. Ye Yang(楊燁), the culture worker in Beitou(北投)
2. Mr. Zhao-ting Yang(楊肇庭) and Pasoa Railway Culture Office(半線鐵道文史工作室)
3. Me. Shi-xian Chen(陳仕賢), the culture worker in Lukang
  Based the information and newspaper clipping we gathered, we list the developing history of Lukang Train Station as follows:
Year
Development
Notes
1905
1905, Office of the Governor-General(總督府) announced “Rules of Banning Sugar Factory,” and established areas of sugar raw materials. The sugar factories started to build sugar railways.


1911
1911, in August, Xin-Gao Changhua sugar factory started to build station—Xin-Gao Station, and ran the business of carrying passengers and goods among Lukang, QiGouZi, MaMingShan, CiTongJiao and Changhua.



1912
1912, Xin-Gao Station added new business among Changhua, ZhongLaio and Hemei.


1914
1914, in June, Xin-Gao Station added GanZiJing Station.


1919
1919, in March, Ming-Zhi XiHu Sugar Factory started to establish the station “Ming-Zhi Station”, and run the business of carrying passengers and goods between Lukang and Yualin.


1922
1922, in February. Ming-Zhi Station added GongChangQian Station and FanShe Station.


1923
1923, in June, Xin-Gao Station added GuoGouZai Station.


1923
1923, in November, XianXi station, the terminal station of Xin-Gao Station, started to run.


1933

1933, Ming-Zhi Station added XiHu Station and NanYualin Station.



1936

1936, Xin-Gao Station was reconstructed.



1946
1946, in May, Taiwan Sugar Company was established. Changhua Sugar Factory still ran the Lukang-XianXi Line, which was called Taiwan Sugar Changhua Line. XiHu still ran the Lukang-Yualin Line, which was called Taiwan Sugar XiHu Line.




1953
1953, XiHu line railway was extended and connected to Changhua line railway, and the two stations were combined as one station, called Lukang Train Station.




1953
1953, XiLuo Bridge was built, and the south-north lines of sugar factories were open to traffic.


1975
1975, because of the serious operating loss, the business of carrying passengers was cancelled. Only the raw material line that carries sugar canes was kept.


1988~1989
1988-1989, the railway in DaTieCuo-Changhua Line was demolished. Only the railway in Lukang-DaTieCuo Line was left for carrying the sugar canes.



1996
1996, in December, the inner railway in Lukang Station was demolished, and the wooden station house was kept temporarily.


2002
2002, in January, Lukang Train Station was demolished by Taiwan Sugar Company.


2004
2004, in Janurary, Lukang Train Station was rebuilt by Taiwan Sugar Company to sell products of Taiwan Sugar Company.


2010
2010, Lukang Township Office rented the Lukang Station to establish “Southern Tourists Service Center”



2012
2012, Lukang Township Office moved “Southern Tourists Service Center” to the Wen-Wu Temple to provide service for people who visit Lukang.

2014
2014, Taiwan Sugar Company ended the business of selling popsicles. Lukang Train Station was closed.




Feedback/Reflection:
  After many weeks of hard work, we tried our best to know the original history of Lukang Train Station. If we didn’t make the project, we would have no chance to know the value of Lukang Train Station. We really appreciate Mr. Ye Yang, Mr. Zhao-ting Yang, Mr. Shi-Xian Chen. They provide many old pictures which were really great help to our project study. We use digital camera to record our daily lives. But, in the past, it was really difficult to use camera to make records. So, when we saw the old pictures, we were all touched.